Could Meditation Be A Viable Alternative to Pain Meds?

PHO FBTW Meditation

Leeds researchers say meditation may be a viable alternative to pain medications… and it has none of the side-effects and toxicity risks. This is a short article, published on our main website, that is  worth the five minutes it’ll take you to read. Just click here

 

 

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The Scientific Support Backing The Stress-Busting Effects of Yoga

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Since the 1960s, the eastern tradition of Yoga has taken the west by storm and perhaps now, more than ever, it’s a widely practiced as a means to help people combat stress and anxiety.

Whilst the origins of Yoga are rooted in  spirituality, there is now an increasing body of scientific evidence to support the postive claims made by its advocates.

This article gives an overview of the current state of scientific support for this ancient practice. Read it here

 

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Raising Awareness in ADHD and ASD: What is “Deletion 22q11.2″?

22q videoclip

Often called DiGeorge syndrome or just “22q”, this is a genetic syndrome that relatively few people have heard of but which is nonetheless fairly common. It can underlie symptoms of both ADHD and ASD.

This video clip gives a superb insight into the condition. To view, please click here

 

 

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Are rub-on pain killers effective?

BL back-pain

There is a multitude of such products on the market, both over the counter and prescription-only preparations, but the questions is, are any of them actually worth the effort of rubbing them in?

To read what the latest review has found, just click here

 

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Sarcopenic Obesity: The dangers of looking thin on the outside but carrying hidden fat inside.

Thin obeseJust because a person looks thin on the outside does not mean that they are healthy on the inside too. The dangers of Sarcopenic Obesity are now well known to doctors and medical scientists, but have yet to be understood by the public at large. Read everythng you need to know here

 

 

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Dr Audrey Tang, resident Psychologist on Sky TV’s “Chrissy B Show,” talks Peak Health Online

Many thanks to Dr Audrey Tang, resident psychologist on Sky TV’s The Chrissy B Show, here in the UK. During a great feature on living with MS, which aired on 24th May 2017, Dr Tang was very postive about our website and our efforts to bring you the best in non-pharmaceutical heath & well-being support. Visit us now, to see how we can help you: PeakHealthOnline.com

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People With Autism Can Hear More Than Most… Which Can Be A Strength And A Challenge

by Anna Remington5

Senior Lecturer in Cognitive Science, University College London

A group of friends are sitting in the garden chatting – only one person hears the ice cream van in the distance. That one person is autistic. He is also able to hear the buzzing of electricity in the walls and sometimes finds it overwhelming to be in a very noisy environment.

Our most recent work, published in Cognition1, suggests why that might be the case: people on the autistic spectrum can take in more sounds at any given moment compared with non-autistic people.

Over the past few years, there has been growing awareness that sensory experiences are different2 in autism. What is also becoming clear, however, is that different doesn’t mean worse. There are many reports of autistic people doing better3 than non-autistic people on visual and auditory tasks. For example, compared with non-autistic people, autistic individuals spotted more continuity errors in videos4 and are much more likely to have perfect pitch.

We suggest that the reason behind this is that autistic people have a higher perceptual capacity, which means that they are able to process more information at once. Having this extra processing space would be useful in some situations, but problematic in others.

For example, when copying a complicated drawing you need to take in lots of information as efficiently as possible. On the other hand, if you don’t need much information to perform a task (when having a conversation with someone, say) then the extra capacity automatically processes other things in the room. This can distract you from what you are trying to do, or make you feel overwhelmed by lots of different sensory stimuli.

A Sound Advantage

To test out this idea, we asked a group of autistic and non-autistic adults to carry out two computer-based tasks.

The first was a listening-search task where having greater perceptual capacity would be useful and help you perform well. Participants were asked to listen to short bursts of animal sounds, played simultaneously, and figure out whether there was a dog’s bark or a lion’s roar in the group. At the same time, they also had to listen for the sound of a car, which was there in half the trials.

The autistic adults were much better than the non-autistic adults at picking out the car sound at the same time as doing the animal task correctly.

The second task involved listening to a recording of a group of people preparing for a party and focusing on the women’s conversation to be able to answer questions about it at the end. In this case, the task was easy and having extra capacity might leave you at risk of being more easily distracted by information that isn’t needed for the task. To see if that was the case, an unexpected and unusual addition was made to the middle of the scene: a man walked in saying, “I’m a gorilla,” over and over again. As predicted, many more of the autistic participants (47%) noticed the “gorilla man”, compared with 12% of the non-autistic group.

So it seems that increased capacity for processing sounds in autism could be linked to both difficulties and enhanced auditory abilities that are found in the condition.

Changing Perceptions

Understanding that differences in autistic attention might be due to this extra capacity, rather than an inability to filter out irrelevant information, can change the way we understand the condition and how we might intervene to help those who are struggling.

Our findings suggest that to reduce unwanted distraction, autistic people need to fill their extra capacity with information that won’t interfere with the task at hand. For example, it might be helpful to listen to music while reading. This challenges the common approach taken to simplify the classroom environment for autistic children, although care should still be taken to avoid a sensory overload.

While we must not downplay the challenges associated with autism, our study raises awareness of a more positive side to the condition. By promoting evidence of autistic strengths, we embrace diversity and undermine the traditional view that autism is only associated with deficits.

References:

1. Remington, A., & Fairnie, J. A sound advantage: Increased auditory capacity in autism. Cognition (2017), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2017.04.002

2. Pellicano, E. (2013), Sensory Symptoms in Autism: A Blooming, Buzzing Confusion?. Child Development Perspectives, 7:143–148. doi:10.1111/cdep.12031

3. Mottron, Laurent. Changing perceptions: The power of autism: Nature 2011/11/03/ print version doi.1038/479033a

4. Smith, H., & Milne, E. Reduced change blindness suggests enhanced attention to detail in individuals with autism, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 50:3 (2009), pp 300–306

5. Anna Remington research profile. http://theconversation.com/profiles/anna-remington-162790

This article was first published in online journal, The Conversation UK, on 3rd May 2017, and is reproduced her under Creative Commons licence. To view the original article please click here

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The use of Biofeedback in ASD

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This is a brief report, from the WHEC TV channel, New York. It discusses the work of Dr Laurence Sugarman from the Rochester Institute of Technology.

Dr Sugarman has been investigating the use of biofeedback to help manage elements of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and reports some very postive results. See the video report here

 

 

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Peak Health Online makes it to Sky TV!

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Be sure to watch the Chrissy B show, this coming Monday (17.04.2017) at 10pm, Sky Channel 203.

Psychologist, Dr Audrey Tang gives Peak Health Online a great mention during a discussion on living with MS.

The photo shows some studio shots of the programme… and don’t forget to visit our main website, just click here

 

 

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An introduction to Audio-Visual Entrainment for better brain health and wellness

You guys out there who follow us will know that we rarely post adverts or videos about ourselves in here but this is one video clip we just had to run by you.

It’s a brief intro to Audio-Visual Entrainment (AVE) which, in our view, is more than likely the safest and most effective technology to support brain health and optimum cognitive and academic performance.

There’s tons of research evidence to support its value in helping with a range of problems, including stress, low mood, poor sleep, pain and ADHD. Best of all, it’s pharmaceutical-free.

Do take a look and, if you’d like to know more, there are some helpful explanatory articles in the well-being library on on our main website which you’re very welcome to visit here

 

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